In my efforts to continue to keep my content minimal, I’ve also been launching projects that are small in scope. Is this a good thing?

If you’ve read my blog before, you may have noticed a past article I published about how I’ve been reworking my online presence with minimalism in mind. So far, that effort has been paying off well! And I’m glad to share some lessons I’m learning along the way. When it comes to minimalism, it’s easy to take the wrong approach and believe that means putting in low effort or thinking small in scale, but neither of those could be further from the truth. Minimalism isn’t about reducing the quality of the efforts you put into your work – it’s about maximizing the impact those efforts have in bite-sized pieces. Lately, I’ve been playing around more with releasing content publicly that I promote very little (or not at all) through my main “brand”. This has allowed me to experiment with some unique, small ideas, and the results have been eye-opening for me. Rather than trying to create massive projects with a…

Life is full of cycles. I start off with minimalism in mind, then later get grandiose ideas for things to improve, only to eventually restart with minimalism again. Welcome to another lap.

When I was younger, I would recreate my website about once every 4-6 months. I was never really very satisfied with the designs or directions, but that was OK. I was learning a lot, practicing my skills, and slowly figuring out who I wanted to be online. But, as I aged, that process slowed down. These days the refreshes only come once every year or two, which is nice for my sanity. Unfortunately, I tend to keep to some similar old habits that I grew into in my younger years. I am a visionary. That can mean different things for different people, but for me it’s about a constant desire to find and execute on improvements. I seek out change, growth, and development. I’m always getting new ideas for how to make things “better”, and I don’t often stop scratching at those improvements until I’m satisfied. The trouble is, this hasn’t ever really been conducive for the type of person…

It can be difficult to navigate the complexities of life, especially when the world is dominated by controversies. Knowing who we are as individuals and what we stand for is a great first step.

A few weeks ago I was talking with a friend about your typical controversial topics like vaccines and the government. He’s that type of friend that I can enjoy sparring with on tough topics: Even though I think he’s a fool sometimes (and he rightly believes I am as well), at least we have a mutual respect during our conversations. I genuinely have love for the guy. After some time during that chat, though, I realized that he wasn’t being entirely honest. There’s a lot of context that I’ll skip over, but put simply he believed that the government was evil because it was mandating COVID vaccines that Pfizer, Moderna, and other companies could make money off of. On the other hand, my friend believed that Rand Paul should be applauded for finding a way to use his position in the government to make money off of COVID remdesivir treatments. When this dissonance was brought to his attention he simply…