“To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.”

This blog post is existential and talks about death. When I was a teenager, I wrapped the words of Eowyn, and therefore the words of Tolkien, around myself like a blanket. “What do you fear, lady?” [Aragorn] asked.”A cage,” [Éowyn] said. “To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.” ― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King This I still fear. I write in my journal regularly, and the topic almost always comes back to “impact”. Can I have an impact on the world? What kind of impact will I have on the world? How should I go about having a greater impact on the world? There’s only one answer to these questions I can ever give, “I don’t know, but I’ll sure as hell try.” Tonight I’m not so sure of some things. There are still questions that I ask, but tonight they…

Sometimes we walk away from the things we were passionate about doing as kids, but that passion never leaves.

Deep inside you can feel the weight of the pit.You’re hacking up your lungs while terrified. You’re trying to spit,but you cannot forget.And you want to but you cannot repentor turn away from all the thoughts and trials you represent. What we believe about ourselves right now is going to serveto read the past aloud but sanctified if you’ve got the nerve.So every wordyou’ve ever uttered, even absurd,goes from your mouth to the people’s. A delightful hors d’oeuvre. Might not be much but the people gather, ready for feasting.They’ll devour your life from childhood while always increasing.They’ll never be ceasing,and even worse, they’ll never be piecingall the clues that point to your built up habits of self-policing. When you were a kid you had some issues, no one denies,but what they ignore is all the good behind all the lies.Good burger with fries.You grew up hoping to impact the livesof those you love, and maybe those you will. But you’re…

Twitter might not be shutting down any time soon, but it will never be the same again.

There’s very little that can be said about the last few weeks on social media that hasn’t already been said in countless angry tweets. Twitter was bought by Elon Musk, the work force was shuttered, policies have been changed, services launched, changed, removed, relaunched, and removed again, and now Trump is reinstated thanks to an easily botted poll. Why give my views, and therefore more ad revenue, to a platform that is determined to be the new Gab? Why contribute any amount of my energy to a place that flies fundamentally against what I stand for? This isn’t even about “conservative” vs “liberal” values. There is a major difference between a place where the public masses can be balanced so that no “side” gets a direct benefit, where the left, right, or in-betweeners can co-exist and argue and flame and block each other, and a place where there is a culture of sarcasm, untruths, and misinformation boldly promoted to benefit…

Why does it seem like we can’t create anything of value if we aren’t doing it for some return on investment?

I’ve been doing a bit of reading into the trends of blogging in 2022, and it may come as no surprise that most blogging experts say that aimless writing servers no purpose. The author gains nothing, the audience gains nothing. There’s no money to be made, no audience to grow, and no lessons to be learned. Whatever. I don’t care. Why does everything in 2022 have to have some ultimate goal? Why does every bit of effort that someone puts forth have to result in a return of financial or social success? Why can’t I just write a blog post, or make a song, or play a video game just because it brings me joy? No. In 2022, people are pushing for video games to add NFTs so people can make money from what used to be entertainment. Every person who creates something needs to have a Patreon so that they can reap the benefits of the work they put…

Maybe this makes me old, or slow, or judgemental, but I don’t want to start something that doesn’t have an end.

I like my books like I like my operating systems. Hmm… maybe that’s a weird way to put it. Let me try again. When I’m choosing which book to read, movie to watch, or series to start, I don’t want to have to faff about using another computer to download wifi drivers so I can find FOSS alternatives to mainstream programs that actually work. Better, but still not really all that clear. If I had to choose between Windows, macOS, or some derivative of Linux, I’m definitely going with Frank Herbert’s original Dune from 1965, and not the extended universe by Brian Herbert which he began publishing in 1999. Look, what I’m trying to get at is, fear is the mind killer. Or time killer. Or both? I recently finished reading the original Dune book. It was slow, but complete. Beautifully written, engaging, and imaginative. After 23 years of believing it was overhyped drivel that my adopted mom’s husband really…

If there’s one prediction I can make about the next decade of the Internet, it’s that blogging is going to be fiercely popular again very soon.

Blogging is set to return with a ferocity that may have never been seen before in the history of the Internet. Social media has failed us miserably. People are tired, and angry, and they’re angry at being angry. No matter what side of any debate you find yourself on, there is no doubt in my mind that you have felt this pain just as severely as anyone else. We’re tired of massive social media corporations manipulating the algorithms to subtly utilize their free services more and more and more and more… all while their real customers and beneficiaries make big bank off our suffering. We want control again. We can’t simply ignore the tired trends of social media, though. Look at how the most viral threads, posts, and micro-videos catch on: They are longer than a few years ago, thriving when accumulated as a series rather than a one-off comment, with more links to external sources, and more visual and…

In my efforts to continue to keep my content minimal, I’ve also been launching projects that are small in scope. Is this a good thing?

If you’ve read my blog before, you may have noticed a past article I published about how I’ve been reworking my online presence with minimalism in mind. So far, that effort has been paying off well! And I’m glad to share some lessons I’m learning along the way. When it comes to minimalism, it’s easy to take the wrong approach and believe that means putting in low effort or thinking small in scale, but neither of those could be further from the truth. Minimalism isn’t about reducing the quality of the efforts you put into your work – it’s about maximizing the impact those efforts have in bite-sized pieces. Lately, I’ve been playing around more with releasing content publicly that I promote very little (or not at all) through my main “brand”. This has allowed me to experiment with some unique, small ideas, and the results have been eye-opening for me. Rather than trying to create massive projects with a…

Life is full of cycles. I start off with minimalism in mind, then later get grandiose ideas for things to improve, only to eventually restart with minimalism again. Welcome to another lap.

When I was younger, I would recreate my website about once every 4-6 months. I was never really very satisfied with the designs or directions, but that was OK. I was learning a lot, practicing my skills, and slowly figuring out who I wanted to be online. But, as I aged, that process slowed down. These days the refreshes only come once every year or two, which is nice for my sanity. Unfortunately, I tend to keep to some similar old habits that I grew into in my younger years. I am a visionary. That can mean different things for different people, but for me it’s about a constant desire to find and execute on improvements. I seek out change, growth, and development. I’m always getting new ideas for how to make things “better”, and I don’t often stop scratching at those improvements until I’m satisfied. The trouble is, this hasn’t ever really been conducive for the type of person…

It can be difficult to navigate the complexities of life, especially when the world is dominated by controversies. Knowing who we are as individuals and what we stand for is a great first step.

A few weeks ago I was talking with a friend about your typical controversial topics like vaccines and the government. He’s that type of friend that I can enjoy sparring with on tough topics: Even though I think he’s a fool sometimes (and he rightly believes I am as well), at least we have a mutual respect during our conversations. I genuinely have love for the guy. After some time during that chat, though, I realized that he wasn’t being entirely honest. There’s a lot of context that I’ll skip over, but put simply he believed that the government was evil because it was mandating COVID vaccines that Pfizer, Moderna, and other companies could make money off of. On the other hand, my friend believed that Rand Paul should be applauded for finding a way to use his position in the government to make money off of COVID remdesivir treatments. When this dissonance was brought to his attention he simply…